Shadowing: MS Clinic

I’ve probably only spent 6-9 hours scribing for the neurology clinic. The provider I worked with is older than the average physician. His expertise lies in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). MS is an auto-immune disease in which the body attacks the myelinating sheaths over the nerves of the nervous system. It can be diagnosed with lesions apparent on brain imaging, but symptoms vary. Usually there is some component of chronic pain, disability due to lack of coordination or difficulty with motor movement, and fatigue.

MS is often confused with fibromyalgia (which is a clinical diagnosis not based on brain imaging). Patients with chronic pain are often over-diagnosed with MS. Though the reasoning may be unclear, it may be a last-ditch effort to diagnose a patient with something, anything that could lead to a treatment plan. Extensive work by Dr. Andrew Solomon has explored how often MS is incorrectly attributed to patients and how to improve diagnosis (as well as how to address the misdiagnosis with patients).

Chronic pain patients get a bad reputation. Some of the negative labels attributed to them are “crazy,” “attention-seeking,” or even “drug-seeking.” I have an aversion to treating chronic pain, which I suspect many pre-meds may have as well. Chronic pain is difficult to attribute to a diagnosis, difficult to treat, and nearly impossible to cure. I’m sure this aversion will resolve with more extensive shadowing and understanding of the physical factors at play.

The provider I worked with is one of the greatest people I’ve ever met, especially as a physician. There are very few people who can make such a strong, empathetic connection with patients. Clinic with him is not like a doctor’s visit, but an engaging conversation in which he and the patient discuss health and treatment options. He is first and foremost a teacher, to patients and staff.

He does not flinch in the face of complicated medical histories, patient pain and emotional struggles, or patient non-compliance. He and his patient come to a truly mutual decision regarding their health and treatment.  He does not shame patients for refusing a certain medication or procedure. The patient only has to explain their reasoning. Whatever it is, he will accept it, as long as they are willing to explain their refusal. The patient feels like they are the one deciding, not the doctor.

I wish I could properly convey the experience of his clinic. He openly admitted to treating me like a resident. In exchange for scribing, he felt he should offer me an opportunity for education. He asked questions and encouraged me to ask questions. All my fear about the lack of neurology knowledge went away. I left more confident and energized. My only disappointment is that I haven’t been able to return for more shadowing.

Have you shadowed in neurology clinic? How was your experience?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s